Tuesday, September 13, 2005

The Written Gospel






On Markus Bockmueh’s page I noted a good link about the bookThe Written Gospel which is edited by himself and D.A. Hagner.

This book comprehensively surveys the origin, production and reception of the canonical gospels in the early church. The discussion unfolds in three steps. Part One traces the origin of the ‘gospel’ of Jesus, its significance in Jewish and Hellenistic contexts of the first century, and its development from eyewitness memory to oral tradition and written text. Part Two then more specifically examines the composition, design and intentions of each of the four canonical gospels. Widening the focus, Part Three first asks about gospel-writing as viewed from the perspective of ancient Jews and pagans before turning to the question of reception history in the proliferation of ‘apocryphal’ gospels, in the formation of the canon, and in the beginnings of a gospel commentary tradition.

Introduction Markus Bockmuehl and Donald A. Hagner;

1. ‘Gospel’ in Herodian Judaea William Horbury;
2. The gospel of Jesus Klyne Snodgrass;
3. Q1 as oral tradition James D. G. Dunn;
4. Eyewitness memory and the writing of the gospels Martin Hengel;
5. Who writes, why and for whom? Richard A. Burridge;
6. How Matthew writes Richard C. Beaton;
7. How Mark writes Craig A. Evans;
8. How Luke writes David P. Moessner;
9. How John writes Judith Lieu;
10. Beginnings and endings Morna D. Hooker;
11. The four among Jews James Carleton Paget;
12. The four among pagans Loveday Alexander;
13. Forty other gospels Christopher Tuckett;
14. The one, the four and the many Ronald A. Piper;
15. The making of gospel commentaries Markus Bockmuehl.

2 comments:

Sean du Toit said...

http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521832853&ss=exc

Free chapter from the book!

Rafael Rodriguez said...

I just finished reading (most of) this book. Not to brag, but one of its contributors was nice enough to give me a copy. Like any edited volume, some essays are stronger than others. But I found overall it was very stimulating, appropriate given the scholar in whose honour it was commissioned. I highly recommend this book.