Sunday, March 21, 2010

Colbert on Beck

As usual, Steve Colbert made me laugh:

Evidently Glenn Beck doesn't want Christians going to a church where they preach the same things that Jesus preached! I think it could be time for a soggy fish award!!

HT: BW3

7 comments:

Gary said...

Nicely done. Thanks for the link.

Bruce J. Russell, Sr. said...

...yes because modern socialist welfare states do so much for the physical health and moral fiber of the poor.

Tim Ricci said...

Beck isn't against charity or the church providing help and relief for those in need or Christian living out what Jesus has taught. He stands against Marxist/Socialist views of "social Justice" which are ultimately unChristian and (historically) lead to the oppression of the people.

美麗 said...

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Brad said...

Mike: You are a wonderful scholar, but on this issue you are a tad naive. Jesus did not preach that the omnipotent state should be the one to provide for every economic, health, and financial need or want of persons. I suspect your convictions are more nuanced than your brief line on this blog entry. Carry on, Brad Green

Tim Byrnes said...

There are those who are preoccupied by the personal sin of themselves and others at the expense of a concern for political sin. There are also those who are preoccupied by the political sins of others at the expense of a concern for the personal sin in themselves and their friends. Neither understand the nature of sin.

Tyler Stewart said...

Very good. Gotta love Colbert on religion and politics.

I think Marx can be an instructive lens for reading Paul, though obviously, you've got to filter his atheist assumptions. His critiques of capitalism are profound. His atheism comes from Ludwig Fuerbach who Karl Barth highly recommends. Barth liked Feuerbach because, in Barth's eyes, Feuerbach was the logical result of natural theology. Feuerbach inverted Hegel's dialectic philosophy to say that religion is the best of humanity put in divine terms. All that to say that to respond to Marx or Feuerbach, or anyone we might disagree with, we have to attempt to understand them first. Merold Westphal's "Suspicion and Faith: The Religious Uses of Modern Atheism" is a great read on the idea of allowing atheist to correct our idolatries.

I like Colbert because he points out how must of us respond to those who differ from us. Rather than seeking to understand them, we just grope at any kind of heated rhetoric we can showing they are wrong. Also, he's funny.

Looking at the pages of the NT, at the end of the day, all churches need to talk about social justice if they want to talk about Jesus.

Tim, good words.