Thursday, June 11, 2009

Reading for a Romans Course

What five books would you put on a reading list for a course on Romans? Here's my pick:

1. Obviously a good commentary is first up and my go-to volume is Doug Moo (though I recommend Tom Schreiner as a less expensive volume since Moo is $100 AusD and Schreiner is $60 AusD). I think alot of Charles Talbert's Romans commentary too for its background info which I'd say should be # 2 on the commentary list. Robert Jewett is great just for its thoroughness and who can forget Ernst Kasemann, James Dunn, N.T. Wright, Joseph Fitzmyer, or Charles Cranfield as stimulating reads as well. I also would give a mention in despatches to Peter Stuhlmacher, A. Katherine Grieb, L.T. Johnson, Thomas Tobin, and Leander E. Keck too. Commentary decisions will be even harder to make once Richard Longenecker (NIGTC), Craig Keener (NCCS), and Beverly Gaventa's (NTL) volumes come out. Note, watch out for a Michael Bird on Romans commentary in the medium term, though this will be more about application and praxis.

2. On background, I'd have to also include Peter Lampe From Paul to Valentinus: Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries, which puts first century Rome onto the map.

3. The purpose of Romans is of course a big topic so Karl Donfried's revised edition of The Romans Debate must be on the list as well. Second choice here is now A. Andrew Das' Solving the Romans Debate which seems like a sober volume opting for a Gentile readership.

4. Must include a history of interpretation of Romans and the best is by Mark Reasoner Romans in Full Circle. A close second here has to be the IVP Ancient Christian Commentary Series on Romans and watch out for the forthcoming series on the Reformers!

5. Gotta have something on intertextuality too, so much to chose from here, but I'll go for J. Ross Wagner Paul and Isaiah in Concert.

Next post will be what top five journal articles would you make students read?

13 comments:

John Anderson said...

No Doug Campbell?

Esteban Vázquez said...

While I have a great deal of appreciation for Moo's commentary (I cut my teeth on it, after all), my choice would be Schreiner--especially if the course requires a knowledge of Greek.

As for the history of exegesis, I think that Reading Romans through the Centuries (eds. Greenman and Larsen) is a far more manageable volume.

Samuel Bostock said...

You don't really need any Greek for Schreiner - he transliterates and translates everything at least once.

Jeremy said...

One fairly recent is Witherington's Paul's Letter to the Romans (2004). It has its limitations, but is another option, emphasizing the Socio-Rhetorical aspect.

Brandon said...

No mention of Klaus Haacker's The Theology of Paul's Letter to the Romans, New Testament Theology; CUP, 2003. I haven't read it but the reviews seem pretty positive.

Daniel Kirk said...

What, is this a joke? All you need:

http://cli.gs/3pZUv8

Jason said...

I think you would have to have some way to get the content of deSilva, Honor, Patronage, Kinship and Purity.

Let's ask Bruce Lowe!

Dirk Jongkind said...

Five books is way too many for students to digest! For seminary level I would require: 1) Read Romans in Greek; 2) Relevant sections of the Institutes; 3) Suetonius; 4) perhaps a commentary Moo or Stuhlmacher (personally I find Stuhlmacher more enlightening, but Moo always gives those nice lists of all the option).

After a course on Romans the students should be able to give an instant summary of each and every half-chapter.

Sean said...

What? No Jewett?

Brandon said...

Jewett gets a brief(!) mention by Birdy. I would have it near the top of my list, but it may be too much to incorporate into a class.

ros said...

No Wright?!?!?!

Kevin said...

I picked this post as a Paul post of the Week.

(http://kevinscull.wordpress.com/2009/06/14/paul-post-of-the-week-5/)

I like your list, especially The Romans Debate. I have a different idea though concerning commentaries which you might find interesting.

Esteban Vázquez said...

Samuel> I am aware of that, but the Additional Notes would provide good fodder for exegetical discussion in Greek-based courses.